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Interviews : Colossvs’ Lochlan Watt interviews French tour buddies Calvaiire and Birds in Row

By on January 21, 2015

Birds In Row is an enigmatic three piece band from the small town of Laval, France. Formed in 2009, they released their debut album You, Me, & The Violence in 2012 through the illustrious Deathwish Inc. label, showcasing a dark, moody, and ever-so-slightly metallic hardcore sound that reflects the likes of Converge, Touche Amore and Oathbreaker within their own identity.

On the topic of identity however, Birds In Row prefer to keep that off any official public record, cutting out their faces in promotion photos, listing their names purely as the first initial, and even requesting that their names are censored from any interviews that they do. They do not want to be anyone’s heroes – and they want the connection to their fans to be purely because of their music. My band Colossvs is on tour with these guys, as well as their fellow Frenchmen and chaotic, grinding hardcore group that is Calvaiire, and after the first two shows we sat down for a chat. Representing Calvaiire was vocalist Matthias Jungbluth, who also runs Throatruiner Records, a killer label that plays host to many underground hardcore and metal acts.

SO HOW ARE YOU FEELING ABOUT THE TOUR SO FAR?

B: It’s great. I thought it would be harder to arrive and then play the shows right after arriving the same day, and not like, taking profit of the day and chilling in the city and doing some sightseeing, but actually we did all of that and it was cool. It’s funny to see… for example when we tour and go sightseeing, we like looking at the architecture and that kind of stuff, and it’s funny to see how Australia looks like a lot of different stuff that we’ve already seen. The people are very welcoming. It’s cool to… either they would be a lot of people in a small crowd, you can always feel that some people are here to see a band and to chat with them, and I felt great, the people at the shows, today or yesterday, it was great, just like I said. It’s cool to see a band giving me the opportunity to play on their gears, which is not in the culture of every country.

WHAT COUNTRIES HAVE YOU FOUND DON’T LIKE GEAR SHARING?

B: America is not like this, except for when you tour with a band, they would be keen to let you use their stuffs, but in terms of local bands, it’s very very different. Not saying it’s shitty or whatever, it’s just very different. Everybody is going to have the same Ampeg 810, but everybody wants to play on his, or don’t want to share it to another band, those kind of stuff. I remember the first tour we did there, we didn’t have anything except for guitars and stuff, so we had to borrow heads and cabs and every night, we had been able to find a way to deal with this kind of gear sharing… I don’t know how to say, but it was pretty hard sometimes, but we succeeded in dealing with it.

SO WHAT COUNTRIES AND CONTINENTS HAS BIRDS IN ROW TOURED IN BEFORE?

B: Three continents… Europe, America, and Oceania. The number of countries I can’t tell. We’ve done a lot of European countries, except for some of the far Eastern, like Ukraine, or Latvia or those kind of countries, but we’ve pretty much toured from the UK, to Portugal, to Turkey, to Greece and everything. We haven’t played all the states in the US but we’ve played a lot of them, although some states aren’t very good for shows, we try to play there anyway.

WHAT ABOUT CALVAIIRE, WHERE HAVE YOU TOURED?

C: It has been many in Europe until now, outside France it has been Germany, Belgium, Czech Republic, but I never thought that one day I would play in Australia, so it’s good to be there.

SO THIS IS CALVAIIRE’S FIRST OVERSEAS TOUR?

C: Yes. I haven’t even traveled out of Europe, so it’s good to be able to see other continents.

AND THIS IS THE FIRST TIME THAT BIRDS IN ROW AND CALVAIIRE HAVE TOURED TOGETHER?

B: We did a short tour for three days together, because we had this show with our friends from Dire Wolves, and it was their release party show, and both bands were involved in the show, so we decided to do three shows together, but like a proper tour, this is the first time. Mostly because now our new bassist plays in Calvaiire, so two thirds of Birds In Row is in Calvaiire, so we’ve never thought of it until now, because maybe it’s a bit hard for them to play two shows in a row.

HOW DO YOU THINK THE GUYS ARE FINDING IT TO DO DOUBLE SETS?

B: It looks pretty good for the moment. I know even our drummer, he likes to play two shows, because it warms him up, and it’s kind of nice, but we’ve never done that for a long tour.

C: It’s a test.

SO YOU’VE OBVIOUSLY ALL BEEN FRIENDS FOR A WHILE. HOW DID YOU GET TO KNOW EACH OTHER AND BECOME INVOLVED WITH EACH OTHER’S BANDS?

B: In Birds In Row, I’ve been knowing [the other Birds In Row members] for almost 14 years. We come from the same small town, and the musical scene there is pretty prolific, is that the word? And we all friends, and we all have different bands, like metal, punk, hardcore, and at the beginning we shared a lot of stuffs. We like to teach each other some stuffs, like ‘you should try this guitar, you should try this pedal’, there’s a very good sense of community there. So I had a band with [Birds In Row and Calvaiire member] before Birds In Row, a punk rock band, so him and I wanted to go on tour a lot, so it made sense to make another band together when the first one broke up, and [Birds In Row and Calvaiire member] joined the band this summer, and also really wants to tour a lot, and is one of the best musicians that I came to know. We met Matthias in a very funny way…

C: We were supposed to share the stage with my previous band.

B: Pidgeon.

C: It was where I was living, in this era, and the show was cancelled, it was just after the sound check, so the only solution we found was to play in this kitchen, which was in a farm.

B: Actually we tried to call a lot of different squats in a bigger town, texting friends, and asking ‘do you know any place where we can play?’ and a friend was like ‘oh you can play in my kitchen’, and he was like deep in the country side. So we booked the show there, and I think it took like an hour and a half to join the place. We did a flyer that we texted the people, and we actually got 50 people to the show, which was crazy, because it was in the middle of nowhere. So people actually travelled. So we met at this show, and we really got along together, and Matthias was not really started, but it was the beginning of his label, Throatruiner, so after that we started talking about ‘maybe you would like to release our stuffs’, and that is pretty much how we got in a deeper relationship.

SO THROATRUINER, HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN RUNNING THAT LABEL FOR?

C: It’s been ahh… maybe a bit more than five years from now. What can I say? It’s still a one man operation. People often think that we are several people, that I’m working in an office, but I’m just a guy who is behind his computer every day, sending emails, packing orders…

B: Making the money.

BIRDS IN ROW IS OBVIOUSLY ON DEATHWISH… AS I UNDERSTAND YOU HAVE A PRETTY COOL STORY ABOUT HOW THAT HAPPENED?

B: It’s pretty cool because it was so unexpected for us. As I told you we come from a small town. Before being on Deathwish we played mostly in squats, and rehearsal rooms, and kitchens, those kind of places. You have to understand, that when you’re in Europe, you have an image of America, and American bands that is very glorifying… most of the movies you watch, most of the music you listen to is from the US. Being part of something there sounds pretty huge to us, even though it’s just a label putting out a band. This culture different, the way we glorify American culture, makes it even more unexpected sometimes. As far as I know, there are two people at Deathwish, there is Trae and Jake. As far as I know, Jake heard of us on a blog somewhere. He downloaded the record was like ‘oh, it’s cool’, and Trae actually got a copy of Compass, our second EP, through Jeremy of Touche Amore. We were not friends at this time, it was just like enjoying the music.

C: He ordered a copy and I was like ‘hey, the singer from Touche Amore likes your stuff!’

B: He’s the kind of guy who just shares everything he likes, he is just like ‘hey you should listen to this band!’ That’s why he’s got a record label now, because he’s all about music. He gave a copy to Trae, and Trae and Jake both agreed on putting us out and releasing some stuffs for us. It couldn’t find any way of contacting us, so they contacted Matthias, saying like that they would like to re-press Compass, but at the time we wanted to do an album, so we discussed with them that maybe it would be better to do an album, and they got in touch with our previous US label, which was Vitriol Records, who put out this Collected LP with all the first songs, just to like introduce the band more in the US, because he only had like 80 copies every time he would release something for us, which is nothing, but he really did this job with Matthias, not buzzing, but just like sharing more of the band.

GENERATING THE INTEREST.

B: Yeah. And then we worked on this album called You, Me & The Violence, two month of rehearsing every day, composing the songs all together, and recording after that, mastering right after that, and trying to put it out as soon as possible. Actually it took a lot of time, because we are kind of like a cursed band, every time we try and use something something happen or something, but at the same time like The Beatles were re-pressing all their records, but the old collection of records was pressing at the same factory where we press records, and it took three months delay. It’s a funny story from a countryside kid point of view. We play music most of the time to get out of the city that we hate and love at the same time. We love the friends that we have but we hate being bored. I would have never thought we’d be doing everything that we do now. We owe it a lot to Deathwish, and to Matthias who worked a lot on Compass, we have seen a change at this moment already, with putting out Compass. He worked his ass off on it, spending a lot of time on boards and blogs and stuff.

C: It was funny, one day we were talking about ‘hey, imagine if you were on Deathwish?’

B: It was a joke, and it actually happened. So when he contacted me he said ‘take a seat man, I recieved a crazy mail’, and when he told me that we really thought it was a joke for a month, because it was so unexpected, so unbelievable. When we learned that Deathwish ordered a lot of copies from our different labels to have them in their distro, we knew it wasn’t a joke anymore.

SO YOU SOUND PRETTY HAPPY WITH HOW THINGS HAVE GONE BEING ON DEATHWISH.

B: Yeah. At first we were worried that maybe it was a label that was too big for us. Even though we are not the best representatives of DIY, it’s something that we’re really attached to, like being independent, and not working for someone else. We don’t want to put out a record because a record label wants us to put out the record, or this kind of stuff. Deathwish to me is one of the biggest labels in this kind of music, artistically and in the way that they are so busy, they are releasing a lot of stuffs. When they asked us to join we were like ‘this is amazing, but what is it going to look like after that?’ So we had this tour booked in the US at the same time, and we got to spend like four or five days there, working with them, just to know them better and to see how it looks, and it was just perfect, it was like Throatruiner in 10 years maybe? It is just an independent label, friends working together, who made it their own job, because they didn’t want to work in a factory. They’d rather release records. It’s just like a good way of picture success in DIY music. It’s a true family to us, really. We keep news of each other a lot of time, and when we go to Boston we are super welcomed, and we really felt good with them, and I’m not even talking about the impact on the band, because the visibility of the band has been increasing so much, and that’s kind of a business thing, but that plays also on the relationship that you have with your label. Now we are supporting bands that I would have never dreamed of support, like we are doing this Modern Life Is War tour on April which is one of the bands that influenced me the most when I started playing punk and hardcore. We toured with The Chariot which was the same. A lot of things have happened thanks to that also. We toured with Converge, pretty much all the bands that I was listening to at this time, so we are very grateful. This is not something we feel like we deserve or something. We are very appreciating the luck that we have.

WHERE DO YOU GO FROM HERE? WILL YOU BE RELEASING MORE WITH DEATHWISH, WILL YOU BE RELEASING MORE WITH THROATRUINER?

B: We are at the point where we try to come back to the people that help us out before. Now that we are more visible, we are trying to give this visibility to bands that we can tour with, to labels that we can releasing something on, so that’s what we’re going to be working on this year, releasing split records with labels that we love like Throatruiner, Anti-Fascist in Germany for example, and we’d like to work again with Vitriol Records in the US because it’s been here from the beginning, but Deathwish is still our label, so they will always be involved in something that we are releasing, not because they are like ‘this is my band, you can’t do something without me’, it’s more like they really want to give their visibility to the bands, and to support the bands that they have on their roster, and everything that they do, their trust is good. If we release something with Throatruiner, they are going to trust us on the fact that this is someone that you should support also.

AND WHAT ABOUT CALVAIIRE LOOKING FORWARD? DO YOU THINK YOU WILL CONTINUE TO SELF-RELEASE THROUGH THROATRUINER OR WILL YOU HAVE OTHER LABELS?

C: That’s something that I wondered when we recorded Forceps, our debut album. Do I want to promote it by myself? Because this is something exhausting, and with my own band, you don’t want to oversell it. But it was also the simplest way to do what we wanted in terms of packaging, visually, and we wanted to release it shortly, so I just got in touch with two or three labels that I appreciated, but I knew that if I don’t receive a positive reply, I will release it by myself, because I prefer to know what is going on in terms of promotion. I am not a control freak, but I love to know what’s happening with the stuff I am working on, so it was easier for Forceps to be released on my label, but if one day we have a bigger label offer to release our stuff, why not?

SOMETHING I WAS INTERESTED IN, IS YOU ARE BOTH FROM FRANCE, AND CALVAIIRE’S LYRICS ARE IN FRENCH, BIRDS ARE IN ENGLISH, WHY DID YOU BOTH DECIDE TO WRITE SONGS IN EACH RESPECTIVE LANGUAGE?

C: Because of my accent. Plus, I know that I am better at writing in English than I am to speak it. I love French, I love to play on it in my lyrics, it’s something I wouldn’t be able to do properly in English, so I choose to stick to French.

B: For me, the thing is that I’ve almost always listened to English speaking bands, except a couple of them that were French and very, very good at writing poetic lyrics. It’s a language that is very hard to use in music, because if you are not very good at metaphors and poetry, it sounds whack. There’s a huge pride about the language in France. If you would like translate The Ramones in French, everyone would be like ‘this is a joke’, but in English it sounds fine, it’s punk rock or whatever, but you can’t have it in French. And even more like, because I wanted our message to be universal. Of course everybody doesn’t understand English, but there are less people understanding French, so we’d rather speak in English. To me it’s even more melodic as a language. If you’ve always listened to English speaking bands, it will sound more melodic than French or German.

C: I know that if my singing was more melodic, you would have to do it in English because it would not sound good in French. It doesn’t sound good.

B: It sounds like mainstream radio shit.. it’s very hard to understand when you’ve always spoke English, and you don’t hear that, but it’s a choice that is pretty important, because if you sing bad lyrics in French, it’s going to fuck the whole band up. In English it’s not very bad I guess, if you’re a bad lyricist or whatever, the music is cool, but in French there is this huge pride about the language, and if you say something shitty, zip. Your music is shit.

DO MOST FRENCH BANDS SING IN ENGLISH?

B: Yeah, most of them. But in some point in the screamo scene, you had those bands like Amanda Woodward, Daitro, that speak in French, but they are part of this scene that I wouldn’t belong to. I wouldn’t write the same lyrics as those guys, they are really better. I’m not a great lyricist in French, and I have the chance to have a good English, because in France we are really bad at foreign languages, it’s a nightmare. I had this chance to be good in English, good enough to write lyrics.

HOW DID YOU LEARN TO SPEAK ENGLISH?

B: School a bit, but most of the people have the same lessons, and you can see that most of the people don’t speak good English. It’s more through booking tours, meeting people, and also because I’ve always been interested in this, and I always wanted to travel, and I knew that if I didn’t speak English I was not going to do anything in another country. I always try to even speak to myself in English sometimes to even get used to it. But yeah, most of the lessons that I took were more like having discussion with people. When you go and have deeper discussion with people, you feel more controllable with the language, and this is where you learn the most about it.

I’VE BEEN TOURING FOR NEARLY TEN YEARS AND THIS IS THE FIRST TIME I’VE EVER TOURED WITH FRENCH BANDS. IT SEEMS A LITTLE MORE UNUSUAL FOR FRENCH BANDS TO BREAK OUT INTERNATIONALLY. HOW DO YOU FEEL YOU GET TREATED AS A FRENCH BAND, SAY WHEN YOU GO AND TOUR THE STATES, OR OTHER PARTS OF EUROPE? ARE THERE EXPECTATIONS PEOPLE HAVE OF YOU?

B: It’s more that none of those people know the French scene. In the screamo scene for example, the bands that I mentioned, are very popular, but other bands, except Gojira in metal, not a lot of people know French bands. We have a lot good bands really, and not just because they are friends, but I am telling this because I really love the records, but they are not touring as much as they should, because maybe they don’t have the time, maybe they don’t have the will to do it, but people don’t know about them. Promotion now is touring.. you can’t base all of your promotion on the internet, because there is so many bands, and even more on the internet, you know back in the day when promotion was radio and TV, there was like 30 bands maybe that you would see and know, and now it’s like 30,000 at least. So you have to tour your ass off and try and play as good as you can, but not a lot of French bands do that. Some does actually, but not a lot of people know about it. We always got lucky when we toured in the US, and in the UK for example, we’ve always got the luck to tour with good bands supporting us, as well as we were supporting them, and being on Deathwish now is of course healthy. Now when people come to us, they know we’re French, and they find it maybe a bit exotic, because it’s not obvious for people to go and see a band that is French, but actually they could do it a lot of time in the year, even more in Europe, because right now a lot of friends are touring, but they’re not touring a lot, so people don’t know and they’re not going to the shows. This is not something incredible actually, just people are making a good deal out of it, but it’s not very impressive. I know a lot of bands that are touring more than us, and they come from more shitty countries.

DO YOU ASPIRE TO BE TOURING FULL TIME, OR IS IT SOMETHING THAT YOU WOULD RATHER KEEP AT THE LEVEL THAT IT’S AT?

B: This is a discussion that we kind of had at the beginning of the band, like ‘okay let’s do a band that is going to tour 300 days of the year’, but at the end of the day, if you don’t have a life back at home, what are you going to tell your songs? It’s cool to be pissed off at society, but if you’re not a part of it, isn’t it being pissed off after something you don’t know at all? Actually the discussion we had with Jake of Converge, because they’re not touring a lot now, and he told me like ‘yeah, it just means something to me as well to not tour that much, because I’m still connected to the real life’. Maybe you’ve felt this also, when you’re on tour, it’s not the real life. People are not that welcoming normally. If you see a dude in the street that needs a place to stay, there’s a good chance that you’re not going to give him a place to stay, but if you’re a band on tour there is no problem. So there is something that is overwhelming, the friendship is overwhelming, people waiting for you in cities you’ve never been to is just, even though it’s unconscious, it really flatters your ego and stuff, and it never happens in real life. So it’s really important to stay connected, and see what you can criticise, and what is good also, because not everything is bad in the real life. Now we’re like more very addicted to touring, but we know the importance of staying connected to this life.

I GUESS AS YOU’VE JUST EXPLAINED, IT’S MORE OBVIOUS THE SORT OF LYRICS THAT BIRDS IN ROW HAVE, BUT FOR CALVAIIRE, ARE YOU SINGING ABOUT SIMILAR THINGS, OR DO YOU HAVE YOUR OWN THING GOING ON?

C: I guess, more or less, what can I say about this? The lyrics on Forceps were written on the large scale. Most of the lyrics were even written before Calvaiire was created, because when I didn’t have any band, I was still writing a little bit, because I’m not somebody who will talk it up, but writing lyrics is the best way to express what I want on some topics. Lyrics in Calvaiire are mainly personal, but the more I am looking at my lyrics, the more I can see that they can be connected to a bigger picture, so I think the next thing I start writing about, are not less centered on myself – still about myself – but I don’t know how to explain this… ahh, the impact of this society on what I am, and I suck at explaining this kind of thing.

B: ‘That’s why I sing in French!’

C: I am good at writing lyrics but not speaking about them.

SO THIS AUSTRALIAN TOUR, MY FRIEND CAM AT VANGUARD TOURING WHO BOOKED IT, HE HAD BEEN TALKING TO YOU GUYS FOR A WHILE BEFORE IT ALL CAME TOGETHER. HOW DID IT EVENTUALLY HAPPEN, AND HOW DID CALVAIIRE GET ON AS WELL?

B: Cam contacted us a year ago at least, because we were supposed to do this tour a year ago, in February, but we had to cancel because we had to make a choice, either we would tour Australia, or we would record a new album, and we really needed to do a new album, so we had to cancel it, thinking maybe we can come to Australia another time. And then he proposed us this tour, so we were super stoked about it, and after the discussion, as two of us are in Calvaiire, he said well you can just bring Calvaiire overseas, and it’s not going to ask more money than much, it’s going to benefit the band also. Matthias and Thomas are two good friends of ours, so it’s like going on holidays with your friends, and it makes sense.

C: With Calvaiire we can’t tour that much because everybody has other bands, so we go on tour with another project and it’s also easier, which is good for me, because I’m not into touring that much. I prefer to do selected tours with friends.

DO YOU HAVE ANY EXPECTATIONS FOR HOW THIS TOUR IS GOING TO GO?

B: I learned to not expect anything from touring, because this is how you get the best time. If you’re going to a place and saying ‘yeah I’m pretty sure there’s going to be like 150 people’, you’re never going to be happy about it. I don’t mind playing in front of five people if they are interested in what we do. All I want is to meet people, travel, and see new things, because this is basically the only way to travel and see the world, even more before when I had no job, this is like a privilege to do what we do, to go on tour and meet people, who will explain their culture, and build a relationship. When I see the map now I can point to any place and say ‘I have a friend here’. This is just crazy to think about it, most of the people will never even get out of their own city. All I expect is just to have fun, and meet new people, and if there is only like five people at the shows, it’s still playing the same music, and I’m still singing the same things, and I’m not going to just play the shows and not be happy about it. I still have to sing those same things. If it was in a practice room with just the three of us it would be the same to me. I’m not saying I’m not playing music for others, but mainly I’m playing it for me and the things I have to tell. But if there’s 300 people in a room, agreeing with what I have to say, it’s cool, but if not, whatever, it’s not the most important.

SO DOES CALVAIIRE HAVE ANY OTHER PLANS FOR 2015?

C: Not right now. We would like to write more stuff, maybe an EP, maybe an album, we don’t know yet. We have a few shows lined, we are doing some festivals in France and Switzerland, and for the moment that’s all.

BIRDS IN ROW SOUNDS LIKE IT’S GOING TO BE PRETTY BUSY.

B: As far as I know we have like three or four releases this year. This is the first year where we’ve had tours – they’re not booked – but almost prepared until November. It’s very crazy and we’re going to be very busy. We do this tour in Australia, then we tour with Modern Life Is War, and then we do some shows on our own in Europe as well, because it has been a while since we played countries like Bosnia, Croatia, those countries that we love, and where tour bookers never book tours, and Spain for example also, and we’ve got big festivals on the summer, which is the first time that happened, and then maybe new countries again, like Asia, Japan, back in the US also, so it’s going to be busy tour wise and recording wise.

I SAW THAT YOU’RE PLAYING SOME PRETTY BIG FESTIVALS, WITH BANDS LIKE BEHEMOTH. HAVE YOU PLAYED THOSE MASSIVE STAGES BEFORE? TO GO FROM KITCHENS TO THAT WOULD BE PRETTY STARTLING.

B: At the beginning, when we started playing even clubs, we were always trying to play on the floor, and be very connected to the crowd. The more we grew up, the more people came to the show, and the more people were disappointed because they couldn’t even see anything, and obviously also the sound is shittier, even though it’s sometimes not the most important thing in punk rock. So we slowly started to go back on stage. Even more with tours like Converge and The Chariot, bands that have always played on stages and manage it well, we got to learn how to use monitors for example. The first time we used monitors, was the first time we played with Converge, in this huge venue, in front of like 1200 people. It was the first time we used monitors, and it was like ‘okay, what am I supposed to put in that box?’ and from this day to now it’s been a long way, but now we feel comfortable on stage. Playing a festival is something is not something that is going to be totally new, but what is new is that the festivals we’ve played is more like DIY festivals, like Fluff Fest, which is the biggest DIY festival in Europe, but playing Hellfest for example is pretty different, because you’re not playing with your friends, you’re playing with Iron Maiden. It’s not the same stage and same time and stuff, but it’s very weird, but the case of Hellfest is a bit different, because a lot of the actors of the independent scene are working there, because it’s still a cool festival, but if we play like festivals that are only about mainstream culture, it would be very hard, just because of the ambience, we belong to a certain part of the music community, so this is kind of the boundary, the limit, when you arrive to something that is copying all the mainstream codes, but still using it for independent culture. It’s the way where you don’t really know where you belong to, but I don’t think there’s going to be a step forward from this, in terms of size of stages and the crowd and stuff.

SO YOU SAID YOU’RE GOING TO RELEASE A BUNCH OF SPLITS AND EPS THIS YEAR. WHEN DO YOU THINK YOU MIGHT DO ANOTHER BIRDS IN ROW ALBUM?

B: We’re going to release an EP this year that is already recorded, just because we wanted to have time to write a good album. We wanted to write something differently to the first album, which means to not rush it. We’d like to take time and compose something very, how do you call it, coherent? Something not more progressive, but maybe less based just on energy, something that brings something to the identity of the band. With the time we changed our mind on how to work on an album, so we prefer to compose a bunch of songs, and also because we changed our lineup, so it was more convenient for us to learn to work with each other on songs by doing small releases like this. So a new album I don’t know yet, maybe try and work on it next year, but it’s nothing sure, because we’re going to be very busy anyway.

ANYTHING ELSE YOU WANTED TO ADD?

B: Thanks for touring with us, really. It’s always weird to go on tour with people you don’t know, because there’s always this ‘are they going to be nice dudes?’ because you’re stuck in the van together for eight hours every day. It’s a part of the stuff where you just have to have faith in this scene, and in the fact that people are not going to be assholes. So thanks for supporting me realy.

I THINK OUR BIGGEST CONCERN WAS LIKE ARE THESE GUYS GOING TO UNDERSTAND OUR JOKES? ARE THEY GOING TO THINK THAT WE’RE FUCKING ASSHOLES?

B: We actually don’t, we just laugh anyway. Like what did you say again? But the connection is pretty easy, when there is no tensions, when there is no laughing at your accent. I mean we laugh at your accent, because you are comfortable with it. But when people tend to laugh at you because you’re foreign, and they’re like ‘you don’t understand shit because you’re French’, you’re like ‘dude, you don’t even speak another language, just shut up’, and it brings tensions. When we’re just poking each other like kids or stuff, it’s pretty cool. I don’t have any problem with not speaking the perfect English, and neither are my friends, so as long as everybody understands everything it’s cool!

You can catch Birds in Row, Calvaiire and Colossvs at the following shows;

Jan 21st @ Crown and Anchor, Adelaide 18+ w/ World View and Cold Front
Jan 22nd @ Next, Melbourne 18+ w/ Deadweight
Jan 23rd @ Musicland, Melbourne AA w/ Old Love and Caged Grave
Jan 24th @ Roxbury Hotel, Sydney 18+ w/ Fat Guy Wears Mystic Wolf Shirt
Jan 25th @ Blackwire Records, Sydney AA w/ Tanned Christ, Thorax and Home Burial
Jan 26th @ The Basement, Canberra 18+ w/ Is Dead
Jan 28th @ Hombre Records, Newcastle AA w/ Safe Hands and Ill Natured
Jan 29th @ YAC, Byron Bay AA w/ Marathon and The Burden
Jan 30th @ Crowbar, Brisbane 18+ w/ Idylls and Fvck Mountain
Jan 31st @ 199 Upstairs, Brisbane AA w/ De Nada and Cold Hearts

About

Mitch Booth is the owner, designer and grand overlord of Metal Obsession. In the few seconds of spare time he has outside of this site, he also hosts a metal radio show over on PBS 106.7fm in Melbourne (Australia) and organises shows under the name Untitled Touring. You should follow him on Twitter.